West Indian Beach Picnic

by Taymer Mason

As idyllic as they may seem, I have always thought of picnics as laborious undertakings that were not worth the trouble. It was not until one day I was back home in Barbados and spotted a couple on a picnic that I changed my mind. It was midday on the West ‘Platinum’ Coast, and the sticky yet balmy May weather was present and teased of rain. The young couple were clearly in love. The floral mat on the sand was probably all his doing, very likely stolen from his mother’s kitchen. There was champagne on ice and a dozen fresh long-stemmed roses that were struggling to stand up to the salt spray. They had chocolate coconut strawberries and what looked like a vegetable lasagna. Four loving eyes and the sunset they created at noon made me realize that picnics could be simple and lovely, especially if made with love.

When we think of picnics we usually think of mayonnaise-based lunches packed into paper bags. But when you are going to the beach bring something fresh and light and reminiscent of the seaside. My rule is as follows: make something that would not cause you to regret that you did not eat at the beachside restaurants. The aromas coming from these establishments tease and tempt, so make sure your fare reigns supreme. Remember you may want to frolic in the water afterwards, so avoid heavy meals that would make you feel over-full and tired.

I was introduced to sushi in the year 2001. I was in Paris, at Charles de Gaulle International Airport. I had an early flight so I’d slept there. I met a chatty Malaysian medical student studying in London. She pulled a folded take-out box out of her handbag and started chowing down on some sushi rolls. “Try it,” she said as she pushed loaded chopsticks on my firmly pursed lips. The aroma was tempting, but I did not know the food – or her – so I did not eat.

Later, after I moved to the French/Dutch Caribbean island of Saint Martin/Sint Maarten, I was introduced to trendy sushi bars, flavorful seaweed salads, and the clean taste of edamame. There were sweet potato sushi rolls, and vegan rolls stuffed with sweet mangoes and mildly seasoned rice, with chewy nori seaweed tying everything together.

I wondered, what if sushi were made with Caribbean veggies and fruit? What about combining crunchy high-calcium baby okras, soft sweet boiled ripe plantain, crisp apple-flavored christophenes, creamy Jamaican ackees? Why not make tempura tofu with freshly grated coconut in the batter, seasoned with Scotch bonnet peppers and served with firm fresh mangoes?

Ingredients

Serves 4

5 nori sheets dried
158 grams (1 cup) cooked chilled sushi rice
vegetable oil, as needed
1/2 cup canned Jamaican ackee
2 teaspoons jerk seasoning paste
5 okras sliced lengthways in strips
Half a red bell pepper sliced
Half of christophene (chayote squash) cut into thin strips
A few pieces of avocado, optional
One small carrot cut in thin strips

For Garnish
Wasabi paste
Pickled ginger
Pomegranate seeds
Baked coconut flakes

Preparation

Place the nori on a sushi mat and spread with about 40 grams (1/4 cup) of chilled rice.

Place a little oil in a skillet over medium heat and add the ackee and jerk paste. Toss for three minutes; be careful as the ackee is very delicate and would turn into mush with too much manipulation.

Cool the mixture for a few minutes.

Add the okra, pepper, chayote, avocado and carrot, and roll sushi tight. Cut into slices and arrange on a plate cut-sides up. Garnish the plate as desired with wasabi, ginger, pomegranate seeds, and coconut flakes. Drizzle with eel sauce.

Ingredients

Makes a scant 118 ml (1/2 cup)

59 ml (1/4 cup) mirin
30 ml (1/8 cup) soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon sriracha sauce

Preparation

Bring mixture to boil on a medium heat until slightly thick. Serve drizzled over sushi rolls.

Picnics require thirst-quenching beverages. And don’t overlook cocktails on the beach! There is something about drinking sweet boozy concoctions in the salt spray that gets you a bit happier. The tamarind trees that grow in the West Indies are not as sweet as the Asian variety but range from slightly-sweet to tears-in-your-eyes sour. Tamarinds are usually made into syrups or candies for children and adults alike. Tamarinds also make excellent beverages with wholesome, sweet, rich flavorPicnics require thirst-quenching beverages. And don’t overlook cocktails on the beach! There is something about drinking sweet boozy concoctions in the salt spray that gets you a bit happier. The tamarind trees that grow in the West Indies are not as sweet as the Asian variety but range from slightly-sweet to tears-in-your-eyes sour. Tamarinds are usually made into syrups or candies for children and adults alike. Tamarinds also make excellent beverages with wholesome, sweet, rich flavor — the pulpy flesh mixed with water has a tart kick. Combine the pulp and water with rum, brown sugar simple syrup, fresh orange juice, cinnamon, star anise and a splash of lime and you have the makings of a party. Transport in a thermos or Mason jar. Do not forget to bring an insulated bag of ice and the knowledge that sweet flavors + liquor = tipsy on the sand.

Ingredients

Serves 6

500 gram box of sweet tamarind pods
4 pieces of star anise
2 pieces of cinnamon
1 orange, sliced
1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
118 ml (1/2 cup) simple syrup (1:1 mixture of sugar and water)
118 ml (1/2 cup) brown rum, preferably Mount Gay brand (optional)

Preparation

Shell tamarind pods and put pulp and seeds into a pitcher with the anise and cinnamon sticks. Add 473 ml (2 cups) hot water and leave to soak for one hour.

Add the rest of the ingredients and stir rapidly removing some of the pulp from the tamarind.

Chill and strain into glasses over ice cubes.

You would think that in a dry hot climate the desserts would be saucy and cold. Some are, but many are dry spiced cakes that are the order of the day. These dry cakes came out of the British-influenced tradition of a sweet treat at tea time. Over time the cakes made their way into small village shops and into Caribbean food culture, sometimes consumed with juice instead of tea. “Lead Pipe” is the love child of Italian biscotti and West Indian coconut bread. It is dry and rich, and spiced in a way that the flavor sneaks up on you after the first bite. Lead Pipe, while sweet, is often eaten with a slice of cheddar cheese in the middle. They are called lead pipes because they are small and heavy, reminiscent of the old lead pipe networks on the island.

Ingredients

Serves 4

Vegetable oil, for greasing
250 grams (2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour
93 grams (1 cup) shredded coconut
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoons raisins
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
125 ml (1/2 cup) melted vegan butter or coconut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
1 teaspoon orange zest
2 teaspoons almond milk or as needed to bring dough together

Preparation

Preheat oven to 177 degrees C (350 degrees F). Lightly grease and flour and 20 x 20 cm (8×8 inch) pan and set aside.

Combine all ingredients together, using as much milk as needed to form a stiff dough.

Knead for five minutes until bowl is fairly clean and dough is smooth and not sticky.

Divide dough into four equal pieces and form into logs. Place in the baking pan.

Bake for 25 minutes until golden brown. Cool and serve.